from the series The Galveston That Was / The Sawyer-Flood House, detail of bay window at front entry, 1962
Henri Cartier-Bresson, French, 1908–2004
Gelatin silver print
Image: 12 × 7 15/16 in. (30.5 × 20.2 cm) Sheet: 12 11/16 × 9 9/16 in. (32.2 × 24.3 cm)
Museum commission

Habits of Mind

  • OBSERVE DETAILS Observe details / time to think and reflect
  • SYNTHESIZE Analyze and synthesize relationships and information / compare and contrast / understand the micro and macro implications

Learning about Landmarks

Discussion through works of art encourage how to approach ambiguous and complex ideas, thoughts, and feelings. The MFAH offers a democratic space where students and teachers can develop, practice and articulate these habits of mind. Remember that the quality of the conversation is what is important, not finding the artist’s “answer.” Slow down and take the time to make careful observations. Talk about what you notice, and try to avoid jumping to conclusions and interpretations. Be sure to give enough time for silent looking and thinking.

Curriculum Objectives

•  Explore photographs as a source of information about the past.

•  Conduct research using photographs.

GRADE LEVEL

5

SUBJECT AREA

Social Studies

HABITS OF MIND

Observe Details

Synthesize

Connecting to the Work of Art

In 1962, Henri Cartier-Bresson and American architectural photographer Ezra Stoller were commissioned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston to photograph historic buildings in Galveston, Texas.  In this photograph, the elegant bay window is partly obscured by a tree branch.  The artist focuses on the grand but decaying staircase and the young girl playing on the steps.

 

According to the commission, Cartier-Bresson was charged with recording the details of the house’s large bay window.  However, because the artist preferred photographing people, he focused on the animated figure of the young girl.  As a result, the lines and textures of the historic house become a foil for the girl, the structure’s age and decay a contrast to her youthful energy.  Cartier-Bresson used a small, hand-held camera that allowed him to move easily, capturing the life in and around buildings.

 

This photograph was included in a book titled The Galveston That Was, a project initiated by Houston architect Howard Barnstone and sponsored by the museum.  Barnstone wrote the text and Cartier-Bresson and Ezra Stoller contributed the photographs. The book’s foreword acknowledges that the museum chose in Cartier-Bresson and Stoller “two pairs of eyes of such broadly different curiosity.” Stoller’s photographs are intelligent, informative, clear, direct, and technically majestic. Cartier-Bresson’s work is ultimately less concerned with the architectural significance of the buildings he was commissioned to photograph than with the way the buildings were used, and misused, by their current inhabitants. Unlike Stoller, who excluded all but the random passerby, Cartier-Bresson found people irresistible and included them in almost every picture.

 

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a noted photojournalist and a master of the “one unique picture whose composition possesses such vigor and richness, and whose content so radiates outward from it, that this single picture is a whole story in itself.”¹ His ability to recognize intuitively moments of significance in human events, and to give them graceful form, influenced a generation of photographers on both sides of the Atlantic.

 

1.  Henri Cartier-Bresson, The Decisive Moment (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1952), n.p.

Observations

•  Study Derrick Man on the Empire State Building.  At what stage in the construction of the Empire State Building was this photograph taken?  How does the artist make the construction process appear labor intensive and challenging?

•  What is the age and condition of the Sawyer-Flood House?  What details in the photograph reveal the building’s age? Discuss this photograph as part of a project to record old buildings in Galveston, Texas. Why are such projects important? How does the photograph represent the time period in which it was taken?

Assessment

•  Use the computer to research a particular event in history by examining photographs taken of that even (ie Civil War)

•  Working individually or in a group, select several photographs that exemplify several aspects of the event being researched. Use a graphic organizer to record details that characterize the event.

• Students pretend that they were photographers at that event. Using the information above, write  an article that could have been included in a news paper accompanying the photograph.

Resources Available to Order

The Art-To-Go lending library features materials that may easily be integrated across the K–12 curriculum. Resources include DVDs, music CDs, children’s books, study guides, poster sets, and collection-based interpretive materials produced by the KFEC. Educators, community leaders, and docents from throughout Texas are welcome to borrow Art-To-Go resources. To place your order, search the online catalogue and add the selected items to your basket. After you have reviewed your basket, submit the order electronically.


The Learning Through Art program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, is underwritten by:

Mercantil Commercebank

The Learning Through Art curriculum website is made possible in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.