Hip Hop, 1993
Earlie Hudnall, Jr., American, born 1946
Gelatin silver print
Image: 18 13/16 × 15 in. (47.8 × 38.1 cm) Sheet: 19 13/16 × 15 15/16 in. (50.3 × 40.5 cm)
Museum purchase funded by Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. in honor of Clare A. Glassell

Habits of Mind

  • OVERCOME FEAR Overcome fear of ambiguity / fear of failure or being wrong / fear of the unknown
VIDEOS

Understanding the Law of Conservation of Energy

Remember that the quality of the conversation is what is important, not finding the artist’s “answer.” Slow down and take the time to make careful observations. Talk about what you notice, and try to avoid jumping to conclusions and interpretations. Be sure to give enough time for silent looking and thinking, and be careful about making assumptions.

 

This Curriculum Connection also includes John Singleton Copley, Portrait of a Boy.

Curriculum Objectives

  • The student knows that the Law of Conservation of Energy states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed; it just changes form.
  • Students demonstrate energy transformations such as energy in muscle cells transforming chemical energy into kinetic energy.

GRADE LEVEL

6

7

8

SUBJECT AREA

Science

HABITS OF MIND

Overcome Fear

Connecting to the Work of Art

“I chose to use the camera as a tool to document different aspects of life —who we are, what we do, how we live, what our communities look like. These various patterns are all interwoven, like a quilt into important patterns of history.”—Earlie Hudnall, Jr.

The subject of this photograph is a young African American boy who approached photographer Earlie Hudnall Jr. on the streets of Galveston and asked him to take his photograph. Shirtless and wearing baggy jeans, the boy looks directly into the camera. He purposely displays his underwear, along with a beeper and a thick gold chain around his neck—items commonly associated with drug dealers and street gangs. The boy’s apparel is incongruous with his age, yet he plays his role convincingly, allowing no suggestion of vulnerability in his cool demeanor. His relaxed, graceful pose projects self-reliance and defiant confidence. His smooth dark skin takes on a velvet quality against the roughly textured cinderblock wall.

To Hudnall, a camera is simply a mechanical apparatus with which to document human existence. He does not pose his subjects, but instead allows his “gut” to tell him when to take a picture as he walks around neighborhoods. He works primarily in Houston’s Third Ward, a predominately African American neighborhood. However, this form of documentation is not truly a factual visual record, but rather a poignant documentation of fleeting glimpses of human emotion.

This photograph’s title, Hip Hop, refers to a segment of American culture that has its roots and a large proportion of its membership in the African American community. Widely used to describe a category of music, hip hop actually encompasses much more, including language, dance, dress, and art.

A native of Missouri, Earlie Hudnall, Jr. moved to Houston, Texas after serving in the Marines during the Vietnam War. He attended Texas Southern University (TSU) in Houston under the guidance of the illustrious African American professor and artist John Biggers. The photography department at TSU was still relatively new at the time, and Hudnall had little experience in the field, having only purchased his first camera while in Vietnam. Yet he showed great promise, and after receiving a B.A. in Art Education in 1976, he began work as a staff photographer for the university. Hudnall has participated in many programs and projects in the Houston area, and continues to work most often in the African American community.

Observations

  • What is your impression of and reaction to this photograph?
  • The subject of this photograph is a young African-American boy who approached the artist on the streets of Galveston and asked him to take his picture. How would you characterize this boy? Why do you think he stares directly at the camera?
  • Hudnall was quoted as saying, "I chose to use the camera as a tool to document different aspects of our life—who we are, what we do, how we live, what our communities look like." Look at backdrop of this photograph. Describe the type of environment you think surrounds the boy. How would the feeling have changed if the artist photographed the boy in a different setting, such as a park or against a window?
  • Hudnall does not pose his subjects, but instead allows his photographer´s eye to tell him when to take a picture. Consider the arrangement of lines, colors, and textures. Describe the contrasts the artist has captured.
  • The boy leans against the wall of a building. His torso gently curves as his shoulder rests against this structure. Some people who look at this photograph see self-reliance and defiant confidence in the boy´s relaxed, graceful stance. Other people suggest that he is a vulnerable child in an adult´s pose. Do you agree with either of these opinions? Why or why not?

Interpretations

  • Is the title Hip Hop surprising to you? Why do you think the photographer chose this title? What title would you have used for this photograph?
  • This image has been described as “striking.” What about the image is “striking”? Consider the line, shape, color, and composition.
  • Why do you think Hudnall would have taken this photograph? Should artists refrain from these types of subject matters? Why or why not?
  • How could this image be altered in order to change the tone of the photograph and its message?
  • Hudnall is known for walking Houston neighborhoods and photographing the people, places, and events that he sees. What other types of images could Hudnall be expected to produce? What qualities might his work characteristically possess?

Assessment

  • Divide the class into equal teams, and divide the teams into 2 groups.  Give one team the Portrait of a Boy and the other team Hip Hop.  (Students will not be able to see the other group’s work of art.). Each team will analyze their work of art. Ask students to imitate the boy’s posture. Describe what the boy is wearing (including accessories). Evaluate the boy’s expression. How does the environment he is placed in affect that expression? Hypothesize where and what time period the boy lives in? Could it be a warm or cold climate? Why? Once each group has finished, they will be asked to switch their answers with the other group (still not looking at the other work of art). Read the other groups’ analyzes of the works of art. Does it apply to your boy? Why or why not? Explain your answers.


 

  • Together as a class, discuss the attitudes of each groups’ analyzes. What are the similarities between the works? What are the differences?
  • The Law of Conservation of Energy applies to this activity.  If energy cannot be created or destroyed, how can we use our analysis of the works of art to show energy transformation? For example, if the sun shone on the young African American boy’s necklace, how would thermal energy transfer occur? If the 18th century boy threw the shuttlecock (birdie) in the air and hit it with his badminton racket, explain how that energy would change. Find other examples of the Law of Conservation of Energy in both art works.

Subject Matter Connection

In science, the scientist has a lot to do with the success of the experiment.  Cutting-edge work requires that the scientist be unafraid of failure, ambiguity, or the unknown.  The more we address the overwhelming success of failure, the greater scientific risks students will take. The Law of Conservation of Energy is often misunderstood.  The middle school student has a hard time understanding the abstract concept of energy not being created or destroyed, but transforming.

Resources Available to Order

The Art-To-Go lending library features materials that may easily be integrated across the K–12 curriculum. Resources include DVDs, music CDs, children’s books, study guides, poster sets, and collection-based interpretive materials produced by the KFEC. Educators, community leaders, and docents from throughout Texas are welcome to borrow Art-To-Go resources. To place your order, search the online catalogue and add the selected items to your basket. After you have reviewed your basket, submit the order electronically.

  • Houston Reflection: Art in the City, 1950s, 60s and 70s
    • A collection of essays by Houston artists, art patrons, collectors and enthusiasts, this book explores the development of Houston as a center of the arts throughout the mid to late 20th century. Includes essays by William Camfield, Charles Criner, Roy Fridge, Dorothy Hood, Jim Love, Robert Morris, Kermit Oliver, Bert Samples, Earlie Hudnall, Jr., Richard Stout, and James Surles.

      MFAH Catalog Number: BK620
  • Songs of my People
    • In 1990 50 African American photographers traveled across the United States capturing African American life. This resource contains selections of their work as well as written interviews with the subjects.

      MFAH Catalog Number: SG668

The Learning Through Art program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, is underwritten by:

Mercantil Commercebank

The Learning Through Art curriculum website is made possible in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.